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Plano’s Emergency Dentist

Relieving Pain & Restoring Smiles

man holding jaw in pain

Should you or a loved one find yourselves in need of immediate dental care, just give the Plano dental office of Robert E. Weygandt, DDS a call. With over 30 years of experience in dentistry and a team of professionals with numerous members who have over 20, we’ll know how to help in almost any emergency dentistry situation. If you’re in pain, don’t hesitate to contact us! We always do whatever we can to see emergency patients the same day that they call in because if someone is in pain, they shouldn’t be left to wait!

How to Handle Common Dental Emergencies

As soon as you call Dr. Weygandt’s team, we’ll get started helping you feel better. That all begins while we’re still on the phone. We’ll talk you through assessing the situation, and we can take you through first aid and pain management steps on the phone as well. If at any time you’re concerned that your situation requires urgent medical attention, please call emergency services or proceed to your nearest emergency room or urgent care clinic. We will be happy to work with these medical professionals to repair any damage to your smile. Below, we’ve outlined some at-home care steps you can take to protect your oral health until you reach our dental office.

Toothaches

Woman holding cheek in pain

Toothaches can indicate a number of different oral health concerns, including tooth decay, root canal infection, and dental cracks. You should take over the counter pain relievers as directed to maintain comfort. If you don’t have any open wounds, topical numbing ointments may also be beneficial. Ice packs can also be used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and slow bleeding from soft tissue damage. Whenever possible, don’t eat until after you’ve seen the dentist. If you do need to eat, stick with softer foods and avoid chewing with the damaged part of the smile. Brush and floss your teeth as usual, but clean around any damaged areas very carefully. 

Chipped/Broken Tooth

Man holding jaw in pain

In many cases, we’ll be able to seamlessly repair your chipped or broken tooth to full form and natural appearance. Until you reach our dental office, you’ll need to take some steps to avoid doing additional damage to the weakened tooth structure. Clean the area around the damaged tooth with cool water. You can bite down on gauze or a piece of clean cloth to protect the remaining tooth structure. This will also help if there is any bleeding after the damage occurs. If there are sharp pieces of the tooth that may damage your smile, you can place orthodontic wax to protect surrounding teeth and soft tissue. For pain, follow the steps above for toothache. Whenever possible, don’t eat until after you’ve seen the dentist. If you do need to eat, stick with softer foods and avoid chewing with the damaged part of the smile. Brush and floss your teeth as usual, but clean around any damaged areas very carefully. 

Knocked-Out Tooth

Woman receiving dental treatment

If you’ve lost a tooth, take a close look at the damage. If at all possible, replace the lost tooth in the socket and bite down on gauze or clean cloth to hold the tooth in place. This will also help to stop blood flow. If you can’t replace the tooth, store it in a container of milk or water until you reach our dental office. For pain, follow the steps above for toothache. Whenever possible, don’t eat until after you’ve seen the dentist. If you do need to eat, stick with softer foods and avoid chewing with the damaged part of the smile. Brush and floss your teeth as usual, but clean around any damaged areas very carefully. 

Lost Filling or Dental Crown

Dentist and patient looking at x-ray

If you’ve lost a filling, follow the at-home care steps for broken teeth above. If your dental crown has been dislodged and is still intact, replace it over the damaged tooth. If you can’t replace the dental crown, place it in a container and bring it with you to our dental office. For pain, follow the steps above for toothache. Whenever possible, don’t eat until after you’ve seen the dentist. If you do need to eat, stick with softer foods and avoid chewing with the damaged part of the smile. Brush and floss your teeth as usual, but clean around any damaged areas very carefully. 

How to Prevent Dental Emergencies

There are many emergency situations that can’t be avoided. However, by making some small changes, you can significantly reduce your risk for dental emergency. Below, we’ve outlined some of the steps you can take:

  • Brush teeth twice a day and floss daily to maintain a healthy smile and visit our dental office at least two times each year.
  • Use a sportsguard to protect teeth during any athletic event or practice.
  • Wear a custom nightguard during sleep to protect your smile from teeth grinding or clenching.
  • Don’t use teeth as tools to open packages or crack nuts.
  • Don’t chew on fingernails, ice, or other hard objects.

The Cost of Treating Dental Emergencies

Each patient’s emergency visit and treatment will vary in price, depending on what dental services are necessary to repair the damage. During your emergency dental office visit, we’ll review your treatment plan, including pricing, so you can budget for the overall cost of your emergency care. We are happy to process your dental insurance claims to minimize the cost of dentistry treatments. We also work with third party financiers to offer low and no interest payment plans.

Dental Emergency FAQs

What if I Have a Dental Emergency While Traveling?

wondering woman

Give us a call and describe what’s going on. If the situation isn’t too serious, you may be able to wait until you get home to receive professional treatment from your trusted emergency dentist in Plano. However, we might recommend that you visit a dentist who is closer to you to undergo immediate evaluation and treatment. Then, after you get home, you can visit our team for follow-up care.

Be extra cautious if you’re in a foreign country. Check any dentist’s credentials to make sure you’ll receive quality care. Depending on where you are, there is probably a local dental association, such as the American Dental Society of Europe or the Academy of Dentistry International, that can help you find someone nearby who has the skills necessary to help you.

Does Emergency Dental Treatment Hurt?

Our goal is to relieve your pain and help your mouth heal. During your treatment, we’ll do everything we can to ensure that you’re comfortable. With local anesthesia and perhaps even a mild level of sedation, we’ll help you stay relaxed while we’re repairing your smile.

After any significant dental treatment, you can expect your mouth to be sore for a time. We’ll provide you with detailed instructions that will mitigate your discomfort and help your recovery go as smoothly as possible.

In What Situations Should I Visit the Emergency Room Instead of a Dental Office?

If you’ve suffered a significant jaw injury, such as a broken jaw, or there is a large amount of bleeding, head to the emergency room right away. After they provide initial treatment, you can visit us later for further care.

Also, if you have a throbbing toothache that is accompanied by a fever or other systemic symptoms, it may be best to visit an ER. An infection that starts in the mouth and spreads throughout the body is more than a dental emergency; it is a medical emergency that could even be life-threatening.

What if My Child Breaks a Baby Tooth? Is That Considered a Dental Emergency?

A child’s primary teeth are very important to their long-term oral health. If your child breaks one of their baby teeth, or one of those teeth gets knocked out, bring them to our office as soon as possible. We’ll evaluate the situation, provide pain relief, and recommend a treatment based on your child’s unique circumstances.